Check out the MTB Strong workout program

STARTING WITH THE WORST, here are some approaches to off-bike training.

4. Doing none of it. Just ride yer bike Bro.

3. Doing it haphazardly. When I was young, every day was a max day. Rest days? Only for the weak!

2. Following a program designed by an expert and delivered online.

1. Working live in person with a qualified doctor/trainer a la Revo Physiotherapy and Sports Performance in Boulder CO. This is the best! And I’ve been fortunate to receive this therapy. But it isn’t accessible for everyone.

For many riders, your best value is following a program designed by an expert in riding and training. Dee Tidwell at Enduro MTB Training is such an expert, and he’s launched a new program.

I promote Dee here because A) he’s a good fellow, B) he’s helped me and C) he can likely help you.

Check out the MTB Strong training program >>>

8 things I love about my Specialized AWOL

I’ve been riding this bike for 16 months, and I’ve grown to love it. Let me count the ways …

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The morning after my first RipRow workout: my hamstrings!

The morning after.. my hamstrings are tight and I walk funny. Usually when I do a bend over stretch i can put my palms on the floor, today I barely make it to the floor.

Should I have stretched more or less or differently? Ironically, regarding the one stretch I do most regularly (bending over) I just found an article saying it’s bad.

thoughts?

Dieter

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Is the new geometry worth a bike upgrade?


Dear Lee

I have a Stumpjumper FSR Comp 29er from 2014. I really like this bike BUT I know the the newer bikes of the same type changed quite a bit in terms of the geometry. They have shorter chainstays and a slacker head angle for example. What are your thoughts about this? I don’t have a lot of money to spend for a new bike but I’m asking myself whether I would improve my riding with a longer and slacker geometry.

Hopefully you can help me quickly with some insights.

Thanks a lot and kind regards,

Reto

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Quick and easy way to find your ideal MTB handlebar width

This article is adapted from the book Dialed and ran on Pinkbike.

I hope you find it helpful.

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Dialing in your bike setup step 1: Make it RAD

 

 

This article is adapted from the book Dialed and ran on Pinkbike. It lays out the most important aspect of mountain bike fit and setup.
I hope you find it helpful!

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Question about RAD bike-setup number

Lee,

I wanted to discuss your RAD number idea a little more.  I read your article on Pinkbike and used the suggested ratio to calculate my RAD number and then went out to the shop and checked all my bikes.  It was interesting.  My BMX and 4X/dirt jump bike both were spot on the number.  My medium Yeti SB66 with 50 mm stem was 20mm longer and my Specialized Epic WC was 70 mm longer.  I found this interesting as did not set up any of these bike with RAD.  I got to thinking and have an additional question.  Both the BMX and dirt jumper you ride standing up all the time.  However with the Yeti and Epic I spend and increasing amount of time sitting and pedaling.  I put a long seatpost in the dirt jumper and got my saddle position set and that made the reach to the bars feel way to close for seated riding.  Your thoughts?  As a side note one thing that I have noticed in the past on my bikes is that I tend to tuck the front wheel in corners as apposed to a front wheel slide.  Could this be due to to much weight on the front wheel?  Also with regards to “new” bikes out there I would typically be a size M, but with longer reach numbers maybe I need to look at size S as you suggest.

In any case, thanks for you input as always.  You have been great to both Susan and myself in the past.  I have also gotten the pump track built in the back yard, so if you ever make it up to Spokane you have a place to stay and rip some laps. 

Greg S

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Here’s a sweet Sweet Little Track pump track

Hi Lee,

Just wanted to circle back with you (finally) as we built the Sweet Little Track back in late June. It turned out great and your plans and overall instructions were very helpful to this end. It’s a blast to ride and as you note it really freaks you out when you first experience the speed of pumping! Such a workout too, reminds me so much of steep fall line skiing.

Here are some pics after we first built it. Since then we have seeded the backside of the berms with grass for erosion protection.

There’s a few flat spots between the interior berms. OK for now as keeps the speed in check. The gap between the 110 berms is our entry point. Might do a bit of shaping with the rollers here a some point but fine for now. I ride it with a 20″ BMX bike and its great!

Hope you have a great Christmas season with your family and all best in the New Year!

Dean

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5 x 8 easy minutes on the trainer and RipRow

Lee,

Did a mellow 5 x 8 minute spin/RipRow workout a couple days ago. Really felt it in the butt/back and later coming down the stairs, definitely not how I’d feel with 45 minutes of easy trainer work!

I have a CycleOps Hammer smart trainer, used it in erg mode at around 170 watts and adjusted as I warmed up and aimed for about 100 RPM. On the RipRow the fours pattern on about 3 or 4.

Interesting to look at the workout from Training Peaks so you can see heart rate during the RipRow intervals (when power goes to 0). Heart rate is either the same or increases during the RipRow efforts.

Ted

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Base training on the RipRow

Hi Lee,

I hope you are doing well!

I am interested, how you structure your endurance training this winter.

I started the Pump Up the Base off-season training program last week and I did half the intervals on the bike trainer and the other half on the RipRow. After each interval, I switched to the other machine.

Later in the program, when the intervals get longer, I will probably also alternate within the intervals.

I read that you are not pedaling at all at the moment!? Are you doing all the PUTB protocols on the RipRow right now or do you adapt anything (the number/lengths of the intervals)?

Thanks!

Lars

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Questions after reading Dialed

Hi Lee,

First of all, thank you for all your work on the blog – it really is a standout in the bike-internet-knowledge base. As well as Dialed e-book that I bought today.

After reading it, I have some questions. Perhaps you will find time to answer them?

1. How can I access the rider-and-bike calculator (I always get a “This page requires a membership to view” notification when I login with my e-mail: wooyek@gmail.com)?
2. “RAD, RAAD, Reach and Stack Table” – are these actual frame dimensions (“official” reach/stack used by manufacturers) or do they include cockpit dimensions?
3. If handlebar rotation should not be used to dial-in the RAD, what method should be used first, give the stem spacers are not enough?
4. What is your method to measure RAAD?
5. How would you describe rider’s “average proportions”? Do you know the average inseam-to-height ratio?
Thank you in advance, best regards!

Michal

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A little math about Jordie Lunn’s amazing drop-in

If you haven’t seen Rough AF 3, see it now:

The drop-in Jordie does at the beginning of the video … awesome!

I needed to do a little math. Based on eyeball assumptions:

Assuming a height of 16 meters and a transition radius of 8 meters, that yields 4 Gs in the transition.

If Jordie weighs 180 pounds, that’s over 700 pounds. He can be forgiven for collapsing into the rear tire.

Also:

As he transitions from almost vertical to the runout, his handlebars rotate backward dramatically. In LLB language, this is a row.

The row has to happen as fast as the angle changes, which is pretty darn fast: according to my stopwatch, somewhere between 1/4 and 1/2 second. If Jordie doesn’t pull fast enough — and he can be forgiven for this! — he ends up on the back of the bike.

This is so badass.